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Sun Sense for Deep Skin Tones

Sun Care & Self-Tanning

Sun Sense for Deep Skin Tones Sun Sense for Deep Skin Tones

Sun Sense for Deep Skin Tones

Listen up, all of you naturally bronzed beauties. You may be blessed with a sun-goddess-like-glow year-round, but that doesn’t mean you can skimp on your daily SPF. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, many non-Caucasian women have the misconception that they are immune to the sun’s harmful rays. In fact, a recent study surveyed 65% of women with deep skin tones who said they felt they were not at risk for skin cancer[1]. But the reality is that for Black, Hispanic, Asian and Native American women, early detection of melanoma is just as important for you as it is for your fair-skinned friends.

Here are the alarming stats: Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and the chance for survival is increasingly grim as it advances. The 5-year survival rate for Black women with skin cancer is 78% versus 92% for White women[2]. And, the risk is increasing among Hispanics. In a nutshell, deeper skin tones have a lower risk for melanoma because they have more melanin, but because early warning signs are frequently overlooked the cases are more likely to be fatal at a later stage [3].

So, be smart about your sun and apply a broad spectrum sunscreen daily to protect against UVA and UVB rays.

Keep in mind, up to 75% of melanoma cases in darker skin tones appeared on the palms, soles of feet and under the finger and toe nails [4], so be sure to pay close attention to those areas. Read Self Exam: 5 Ways to Spot Skin Cancer and remember to check in with your derm once a year.

References

[1]1 Kim M, et al. Perception of skin cancer risk by those with ethnic skin. Arch Dermatol 2009; 145:207-8

[2] Wu XC, et al. Racial and ethnic variations in incidence and survival of cutaneous melanoma in the United States, 1999-2006. J AM Acad Dermatol 2011;65:S26-37

[3] Skincancer.org http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/skin-cancer-and-skin-of-color

[4] Skincancer.org http://www.skincancer.org/prevention/skin-cancer-and-skin-of-color